1. Patient Resources
  2. During Your Pregnancy
  3. Vaccinations in Pregnancy

Vaccinations in Pregnancy

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends two vaccines during pregnancy: Tdap and influenza. These vaccines can protect you from infection and can also help protect your newborn baby until your baby is old enough to receive vaccinations. Influenza (the flu) and pertussis (whooping cough) can be particularly dangerous for infants,

Flu (influenza) vaccine

The flu vaccine is recommended for women who are pregnant during flu season- typically November through March. Pregnant women are much more likely to become severely ill from influenza, including illness resulting in hospitalization. Flu may also be harmful for a pregnant woman’s developing baby. The flu vaccine can be given at any point in pregnancy. The flu shot is made from an inactivated virus, so it’s safe for both you and your baby. Avoid the influenza nasal spray vaccine, which is made from a live virus. The flu vaccine is also recommended to all family members caring for a newborn as babies cannot get a the flu vaccine until they are 6 months old.

Tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine

One dose of Tdap vaccine is recommended during each pregnancy to protect your newborn from whooping cough (pertussis), regardless of when you had your last Tdap or tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccination. Ideally, the vaccine should be given between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. Tdap may safely be given at the same time as other vaccinations.

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